A Tribal Adaptation Menu for Indigenous-led Climate Adaptation, including Background and Case Studies

A Tribal Adaptation Menu for Indigenous-led Climate Adaptation, including Background and Case Studies

Organizer: 
Robert W Croll
Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission
Time Slot: 
Concurrent Sessions 5
Session Type: 
Symposium
Abstract: 

Traditional and Indigenous knowledge and perspectives have not often been recognized in planning resources for climate adaptation in natural and cultural resource management. This symposium will introduce participants to a new Tribal Adaptation Menu, designed to assist in developing specific adaptation actions that recognize and incorporate tribal perspectives. The Tribal Adaptation Menu was created to help integrate tribal and traditional values with climate adaptation planning processes, such as the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science Adaptation Workbook. This first version of the Tribal Adaptation Menu was intentionally created from Ojibwe and Menominee perspectives, languages, concepts, and values. Future versions will be co-developed by other Indigenous peoples, with their languages, concepts, strategies and approaches. The Tribal Adaptation Menu may be used as a tool to help bridge communication barriers for non-tribal persons or organizations interested in indigenous approaches to adaptation and the needs and values of diverse tribal communities. This symposium will consist of a series of presentations that introduce the concept of an adaptation menu, describe the Tribal Adaptation Menu, introduce a Guiding Principles document which describes a general process for working with tribal communities, and provide two case studies of real-world projects that have used the menu.

Presentations

What are climate adaptation menus and how do they work?
Stephen Handler, Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science
Introduction to the Tribal Adaptation Menu – why is it necessary and what does it look like?
Melonee Montano, Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission
Guiding Principles: necessary ideas and context to support a Tribal Adaptation Menu
Katy Bresette, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe
Guiding Principles: necessary ideas and context to support a Tribal Adaptation Menu
Gerald Jondreau, Michigan Tech, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science
Comparing Climate Adaptation Menus: A Waabizheshi Case Study
Tanya Aldred, Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission
Developing Relationships for Tribal Forest Adaptation and Resilience Education
Christopher Caldwell, College of Menominee Nation, Sustainable Development Institute