How are we Adapting to Coastal Threats? Emerging Management Approaches to Support Coastal Resilience

How are we Adapting to Coastal Threats? Emerging Management Approaches to Support Coastal Resilience

Organizer: 
Michelle Dana Staudinger
DOI Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center
Time Slot: 
Luncheon Sessions Day 3
Session Type: 
Symposium
Abstract: 

Sea level is on the rise globally, causing coastal storm impacts to become more intense, enhancing erosion of shorelines, shrinking estuarine and brackish water ecosystems, and increasing flooding - even on sunny days - as rising waters interact with tidal cycles. Gradual and acute threats from sea level rise (SLR) require innovative, holistic and collaborative approaches to reduce risk including coastal adaptation strategies that consider short- and long-term climate scenarios, uncertainty, and cost-benefit analyses. This symposium will highlight a range of approaches being implemented in coastal areas throughout the United States to assist natural and human communities sustain and adapt to SLR, storms and flooding. Presentations will provide perspectives from the Pacific Islands to the Gulfs of Maine and Mexico on emerging techniques and tools that help prioritize actions, utilize natural infrastructure techniques, identify and design conservation reserves, and support robust decision making to maximize ecosystem services and resilience. A panel discussion will consider the greatest successes, opportunities and remaining challenges that practitioners face in adapting socio-ecological systems to current and future impacts.

Cross-Cutting Themes: 

Presentations

Synthesis of thresholds, management approaches and ecosystem services in support of coastal zone socio-ecological adaptation
Emily Powell, National Wildlife Federation
Hawaii sea level rise vulnerability and adaptation
Bradley Romine, Hawaii Sea Grant and the Pacific Islands Climate Adaptation Science Center
Considering issues of scale, uncertainty and risk when designing adaptation strategies for global change.
Mitch Eaton, USGS Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center
Considering issues of scale, uncertainty and risk when designing adaptation strategies for global change.
Fred Johnson, USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center
The Use of Ecological Resilience Metrics to Measure Project Performance: Getting to Implementation on the Coastal Landscape
Rick Bennet, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service