Implementing Resilience Across Scales from Your Home to Your Region

Implementing Resilience Across Scales from Your Home to Your Region

Organizer: 
Alex Score
EcoAdapt
Time Slot: 
Concurrent Sessions 5
Session Type: 
Tools and Posters
Abstract: 

There is no one-size-fits-all solution to protect communities against climate change. Resiliency and sustainability measures need to be implemented at all scales to ensure true resiliency: from considering resiliency in regional land use plans to installing measures to protect individual homes and businesses.

This session will explore different methods to of approaching resilience across scales. It argues that to fully protect a region, climate change adaptation must become standard practice and steps must be taken at the regional, city, community and structure-level.

Attendees will hear from experts from government, academia and private business implementing resiliency at a variety of scales including small communities and major metropolitan areas. Presentations will cover a wide-array of solutions including: protecting public health through community heat action planning; exploring the Boston metro region’s journey to becoming net zero; reducing barriers to climate change adaptation planning in small towns and rural communities; evaluating resilience planning efforts in municipalities across the country; and, identifying measures to protect individual homes and structures against natural disasters.

Presentations

#Zeroto101: Clean Energy and Nature-Based Solutions toward Net Zero in Metro Boston.
Darci Anne Schofield, Metropolitan Area Planning Council
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The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is a regional planning public agency serving the people who live and work in the 101 municipalities in Metropolitan Boston. The pillars of our mission include equity, climate change, smart growth and regional collaboration. MAPC is a leader in climate planning taking an integrated, multi-disciplinary, inclusive approach that intersects mitigation and adaptation work. In this presentation, we demonstrate a replicable state of practice that creates Net Zero political commitments, expands climate science and data use for better implementation, leverages cross-sectoral and cross-boundary climate resilience, and prioritizes climate equity for those most vulnerable.

Led by MAPC, Mayors and Leaders of 15 municipalities in inner core Boston have signed historic Climate Preparedness Commitments, pledging to collaborate on climate planning and achieve Net Zero/carbon-free status as a region by 2050. This is one of the first regions in the country to make such a commitment. Using data-driven tools such as the Local Energy Action Dashboard (LEAD) and Metro Mayors Climate-Smart Region, MAPC is helping communities achieve Net Zero by aligning clean energy/greenhouse gas reduction with nature-based solutions for carbon sequestration and multiple benefits. Some examples include green municipal aggregation, LED streetlights, solar, electric vehicles, greenhouse gas inventories, and energy action plans as well as urban forestry for carbon trading, climate-smart parks, and parks and open space planning for climate resilience and sequestration. MAPC seeks to account both carbon reduction and sequestration practices through these practices as a method of achieving Net Zero across the region.

Adaptation to Resilience Planning: Alternative pathways to prepare for climate change
Sierra Woodruff, Texas A&M University
  • Sara Meerow, Arizona State University
  • Missy Stults, City of Ann Arbor
  • Chandler Wilkins, Texas A&M Universitiy
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Increasingly, local governments are creating resilience plans. What do these plans contain and how do they compare to other efforts to plan for climate change? We use plan evaluation to analyze 10 resilience plans from U.S. cities in the 100 Resilient Cites program and compare them to 44 climate change adaptation plans. Resilience plans lack critical elements to prepare cities for climate change, but offer a platform to address economic, social, and environmental policies that may amplify climate change impacts. Resilience planning represents an alternative, potentially complementary, path to preparing for climate change, but there is room for improvement.

Nature's Cooling Systems: Community Heat Action Planning
Melissa Guardaro, Arizona State University
  • David Hondula, Arizona State University
  • Nancy Grimm, Arizona State University
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Increasing urban temperatures pose a public health threat, especially for the poor, those with pre-existing health conditions, and those living in areas with little to no vegetation. There is a vast disparity among Phoenix neighborhoods regarding access to cooling benefits in the urban landscape. City-wide spending for cooling interventions can be socially and geographically inequitable, residents may be unable to afford to operate cooling systems, and underserved communities are less likely and/or able to advocate for heat reducing solutions. The Nature’s Cooling Systems project aims to empower underserved communities, identify and create community leaders, and build awareness about heat-reducing solutions to shift those dynamics.

The Nature’s Cooling Systems project tackles heat at the neighborhood scale to collaboratively develop heat action plans that reflect local knowledge and community identity. It was piloted in three metropolitan neighborhoods in partnership with community residents, The Nature Conservancy, Arizona State University, community-based organizations, city officials, and the public health department.

This presentation will discuss the participatory processes and methods used to engage residents and other stakeholders. A series of workshops was developed and designed to build awareness, social capital, and agency for under-represented populations, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the hottest and highest -need neighborhoods. Examples of solutions proposed by residents include creating cooler pedestrian routes, adding shade structures at bus stops, and developing a heat safety training program. This participatory process will serve as a model for community-driven heat mitigation and adaptation planning for other cities facing increasing heat.

Nature's Cooling Systems: Community Heat Action Planning
Maggie Messerschmidt, The Nature Conservancy
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Increasing urban temperatures pose a public health threat, especially for the poor, those with pre-existing health conditions, and those living in areas with little to no vegetation. There is a vast disparity among Phoenix neighborhoods regarding access to cooling benefits in the urban landscape. City-wide spending for cooling interventions can be socially and geographically inequitable, residents may be unable to afford to operate cooling systems, and underserved communities are less likely and/or able to advocate for heat reducing solutions. The Nature’s Cooling Systems project aims to empower underserved communities, identify and create community leaders, and build awareness about heat-reducing solutions to shift those dynamics.

The Nature’s Cooling Systems project tackles heat at the neighborhood scale to collaboratively develop heat action plans that reflect local knowledge and community identity. It was piloted in three metropolitan neighborhoods in partnership with community residents, The Nature Conservancy, Arizona State University, community-based organizations, city officials, and the public health department.

This presentation will discuss the participatory processes and methods used to engage residents and other stakeholders. A series of workshops was developed and designed to build awareness, social capital, and agency for under-represented populations, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the hottest and highest -need neighborhoods. Examples of solutions proposed by residents include creating cooler pedestrian routes, adding shade structures at bus stops, and developing a heat safety training program. This participatory process will serve as a model for community-driven heat mitigation and adaptation planning for other cities facing increasing heat.

Hurry Up, Y’all! Lessons Learned from Mainstreaming Climate Change Into Rapid Land Use Plan Updates
Jessica Chenault Whitehead, North Carolina Sea Grant
  • Tancred Miller, NC Division of Coastal Management
  • Lora Eddy, The Nature Conservancy of North Carolina
  • Andrea Correll, Town of Swansboro, NC
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Small municipalities in rural and suburban areas often cite lack of funding and available staff time as barriers to climate change adaptation planning. The Town of Swansboro, North Carolina, in coastal Onslow County, demonstrated that these barriers can be overcome through rapid mainstreaming into existing planning process updates. In early 2018, Swansboro received a small 6-month grant to update its land use plan. Knowing that both sea level rise and extreme precipitation events amplified by climate change are threats to the town, staff and elected officials reached out for technical assistance including adaptive measures in this plan update. The NC Division of Coastal Management (DCM) assembled a core team with the Town staff, North Carolina Sea Grant (NCSG), and The Nature Conservancy of North Carolina (TNC-NC). Each partner adapted portions of three decision support processes for rapid deployment by narrowing the focus specifically to wetland conservation opportunities. First, DCM conducted a limited Resilience Evaluation and Needs Assessment (RENA) and produced asset maps. NCSG led a limited rapid-Vulnerability and Consequences Adaptation Planning Scenario (VCAPS) process with Town staff, elected officials, and other key land use planning stakeholders to generate initial adaptation options that could be implemented using the land use plan. The Town prioritized these adaptation strategies further, with the TNC-NC Coastal Resilience tool improving access to relevant science. While not as comprehensive as a full adaptation planning process, the Swansboro experience demonstrates that communities do not need significant funding or time to make progress.

Beyond Infrastructure: Resiliency at Home
Anastasia Roy, APTIM
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rojects such as levees and storm water management strategies can protect communities. This conversation is now evolving beyond infrastructure to discuss how home-level resiliency strategies can promote personal resiliency and help citizens, particularly low to moderate income citizens, protect their assets.
This presentation will use an equitable adaptation lens to discuss the benefits of engaging homeowners directly on resiliency and encouraging cost-effective improvements. Attendees will hear how three cities - New Orleans, New York City and Boulder – have implemented residential resiliency and how residential resiliency has helped their respective governments address larger policy goals such as social equity and economic resilience.
The City of New Orleans has launched a Community Adaptation Program by creating a resiliency district in the Gentilly neighborhood to demonstrate the benefits of stormwater interventions, reduce the area’s collective flood risk and support workforce development to build skilled labor.
The Center for New York City Neighborhoods developed a comprehensive initiative to reduce the risk of flood damage and cost of flood insurance for homeowners in areas impacted by Superstorm Sandy.
The City of Boulder developed the Home Preparedness Assessment Program to educate homeowners about risk and resilience, subsidize particular improvements, and learn more about widespread vulnerabilities affecting residents.