Beyond the Literature Review: Putting Climate Adaptation Syntheses to Work for Managers

Beyond the Literature Review: Putting Climate Adaptation Syntheses to Work for Managers

Organizer: 
Nicole DeCrappeo
Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center
Time Slot: 
Luncheon Sessions Day 2
Session Type: 
Working Group
Abstract: 

Due to limited resources and capacity in their agencies or departments, many resource managers do not have access to, nor time to read, the latest scientific literature on topics that are relevant to their jobs. As a result, EcoAdapt, the Department of the Interior Climate Adaptation Science Centers (CASCs), and the University of Washington's Climate Impacts Group often hear requests for synthesis reports, fact sheets, and other distilled forms of known information on climate change impacts and adaptation options. But it can be difficult to put even the best literature review or state-of-science report into action: how can busy resource managers convert synthesized scientific information into climate-smart conservation or restoration measures on the ground? Contributing further to the challenge is that scientific studies on the effectiveness of climate adaptation actions are scarce and, when they do exist, may not be appropriate for the environmental conditions, spatial and time scales, or predicted future climate that any one resource manager faces.

In this working group session, we’ll collectively explore methods for creating climate adaptation syntheses that can be used directly by a wide array of managers and scientists. Participants will learn about processes that EcoAdapt, the CASCs, the University of Washington's Climate Impacts Group and others have developed for producing management-relevant syntheses. They will also be invited to evaluate these methods and suggest improvements or alternatives to collecting, compiling, analyzing, and presenting synthetic information on the effectiveness of climate adaptation actions.

Cross-Cutting Themes: 

Co-organizers:

Rachel Gregg, EcoAdapt
Amy Snover, Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington